A Crazy Little Thing Called "Hate"

August 31, 2009 by  
Filed under Patrick's Blog



I had figured that Michael Sean Winters’ recent psychodrama in America Magazine — “The Boors Who Demean Ted Kennedy” — would have a brief shelf-life, as most such gimcrackery usually does, but I was wrong.

A related outbreak of foot-in-mouth disease has erupted on a blog written by a theologian named William D. Lindsey who, like Mr. Winters, excoriated my response to Sr. Maureen Fiedler’s obit for Ted Kennedy (He Made Me Proud to Be a Catholic”). He characterized my comments as “hating on Ted Kennedy” and being part of a wider “festival of hate.”

Hate? Hate? Eh, not so much.

Upon scrutinizing Mr. Lindsey’s complaints, I must say that I just don’t see “hate” in the words and actions of the Catholics he attacks, such as Archbishop Charles Chaput of Denver, whom he accuses by name of joining in with those who are “shouting and threatening and jubilating at the thought of destruction of good people and good plans.”

That kind of fatuous nonsense is reminiscent of a line from Alice in Wonderland:


If I had a world of my own, everything would be nonsense. Nothing would be what it is because everything would be what it isn’t. And contrary-wise; what it is it wouldn’t be, and what it wouldn’t be, it would. You see?”


Oh, yes, I do indeed. And it would appear that Mr. Lindsey inhabits a world very much like that which Alice describes.

(Thought Experiment: Read Mr. Lindsey’s blog post for yourself and tell me who you think is doing all the shouting and threatening, etc., mkay? And, of course, if you’d really like to test the veracity of his accusations, why not join us in person on October 8th when we honor Archbishop Chaput for his stalwart defense of the Catholic Faith. Come meet the good archbishop in person, hear him speak, and see for yourself if he is anything even remotely like the cretin described in Mr. Lindsey’s risible caricature.)

And if you wish to peruse Mr. Lindsey’s fulsome fulminations regrding moi and the monks and faculty of Belmont Abbey College, simply scroll down past about 20 tedious paragraphs to the one which begins, “MIchael Sean Winters has dared . . .”

And be sure to take note of the loving terminology he uses to describe Catholics who speak up about things like, you know, abortion. Here are a few examples of the love being dished out on his blog:

“Ghouls and goblins now prancing around in the light of day, occupying center stage,” “mobs,” “exceptionally mean-spirited,” “army of malicious fools,” “maleficence,” and, of course, the ever-popular epithets reserved especially for when one is speaking about pro-life men and women: “hate” and “hatred.”

When one encounters such torrid rhetoric, so heavily freighted with invective, as this stuff is, you just have to wonder where all that rage is coming from. It sure isn’t consonant with the fruits of the Holy Spirit.

Even a theologian should be able to recognize that.

A Crazy Little Thing Called "Hate"

August 31, 2009 by  
Filed under Patrick's Blog



I had figured that Michael Sean Winters’ recent psychodrama in America Magazine — “The Boors Who Demean Ted Kennedy” — would have a brief shelf-life, as most such gimcrackery usually does, but I was wrong.

A related outbreak of foot-in-mouth disease has erupted on a blog written by a theologian named William D. Lindsey who, like Mr. Winters, excoriated my response to Sr. Maureen Fiedler’s obit for Ted Kennedy (He Made Me Proud to Be a Catholic”). He characterized my comments as “hating on Ted Kennedy” and being part of a wider “festival of hate.”

Hate? Hate? Eh, not so much.

Upon scrutinizing Mr. Lindsey’s complaints, I must say that I just don’t see “hate” in the words and actions of the Catholics he attacks, such as Archbishop Charles Chaput of Denver, whom he accuses by name of joining in with those who are “shouting and threatening and jubilating at the thought of destruction of good people and good plans.”

That kind of fatuous nonsense is reminiscent of a line from Alice in Wonderland:


If I had a world of my own, everything would be nonsense. Nothing would be what it is because everything would be what it isn’t. And contrary-wise; what it is it wouldn’t be, and what it wouldn’t be, it would. You see?”

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Oh, yes, I do indeed. And it would appear that Mr. Lindsey inhabits a world very much like that which Alice describes.

(Thought Experiment: Read Mr. Lindsey’s blog post for yourself and tell me who you think is doing all the shouting and threatening, etc., mkay? And, of course, if you’d really like to test the veracity of his accusations, why not join us in person on October 8th when we honor Archbishop Chaput for his stalwart defense of the Catholic Faith. Come meet the good archbishop in person, hear him speak, and see for yourself if he is anything even remotely like the cretin described in Mr. Lindsey’s risible caricature.)

And if you wish to peruse Mr. Lindsey’s fulsome fulminations regrding moi and the monks and faculty of Belmont Abbey College, simply scroll down past about 20 tedious paragraphs to the one which begins, “MIchael Sean Winters has dared . . .”

And be sure to take note of the loving terminology he uses to describe Catholics who speak up about things like, you know, abortion. Here are a few examples of the love being dished out on his blog:

“Ghouls and goblins now prancing around in the light of day, occupying center stage,” “mobs,” “exceptionally mean-spirited,” “army of malicious fools,” “maleficence,” and, of course, the ever-popular epithets reserved especially for when one is speaking about pro-life men and women: “hate” and “hatred.”

When one encounters such torrid rhetoric, so heavily freighted with invective, as this stuff is, you just have to wonder where all that rage is coming from. It sure isn’t consonant with the fruits of the Holy Spirit.

Even a theologian should be able to recognize that.

A Look at Senator Kennedy’s Letter to the Pope

August 30, 2009 by  
Filed under Patrick's Blog

Portions of the personal letter which the late Senator Edward Kennedy sent to Pope Benedict XVI some months before he died have been published online.

Kennedy was, understandably, reaching out for some spiritual comfort and encouragement from the pope — something which the Holy Father duly assured him of in his letter of response. While some of the senator’s comments, such as where he begs the pope to pray for him, are poignant and elicit my heartfelt sympathy, others I find somewhat . . . curious. In any case, today being the Lord’s Day, I will continue to pray for the late senator in a special way, offering my Communion intention at Mass today for the repose of his soul.

Excerpts of the letter from Sen. Edward M. Kennedy that President Barack Obama delivered to Pope Benedict XVI earlier this year and an account of the pope’s response, as read by Cardinal Theodore E. McCarrick, archbishop emeritus of Washington:

“Most Holy Father I asked President Obama to personally hand deliver this letter to you. As a man of deep faith himself, he understands how important my Roman Catholic faith is to me, and I am so deeply grateful to him. I hope this letter finds you in good health. I pray that you have all of God’s blessings as you lead our church and inspire our world during these challenging times. I am writing with deep humility to ask that you pray for me as my own health declines.

“I was diagnosed with brain cancer more than a year ago and although I continue treatment, the disease is taking its toll on me. I am 77 years old and preparing for the next passage of life. I have been blessed to be part of a wonderful family and both of my parents, particularly my mother, kept our Catholic faith at the center of our lives. That gift of faith has sustained and nurtured and provides solace to me in the darkest hours. I know that I have been an imperfect human being, but with the help of my faith I have tried to right my path. I want you to know Your Holiness that in my nearly 50 years of elective office I have done my best to champion the rights of the poor and open doors of economic opportunity. I have worked to welcome the immigrant, to fight discrimination and expand access to health care and education. I have opposed the death penalty and fought to end war.

“Those are the issues that have motivated me and have been the focus of my work as a United States senator. I also want you to know that even though I am ill, I am committed to do everything I can to achieve access to health care for everyone in my country. This has been the political cause of my life. I believe in a conscience protection for Catholics in the health field and I will continue to advocate for it as my colleagues in the Senate and I work to develop an overall national health policy that guarantees health care for everyone. I have always tried to be a faithful Catholic, Your Holiness, and though I have fallen short through human failings, I have never failed to believe and respect the fundamental teachings of my faith. I continue to pray for God’s blessings on you and on our church and would be most thankful for your prayers for me.”

An account from the Vatican of the pope’s response, according to McCarrick . . . (continue reading)

A Look at Senator Kennedy's Letter to the Pope

August 30, 2009 by  
Filed under Patrick's Blog

Portions of the personal letter which the late Senator Edward Kennedy sent to Pope Benedict XVI some months before he died have been published online.

Kennedy was, understandably, reaching out for some spiritual comfort and encouragement from the pope — something which the Holy Father duly assured him of in his letter of response. While some of the senator’s comments, such as where he begs the pope to pray for him, are poignant and elicit my heartfelt sympathy, others I find somewhat . . . curious. In any case, today being the Lord’s Day, I will continue to pray for the late senator in a special way, offering my Communion intention at Mass today for the repose of his soul.

Excerpts of the letter from Sen. Edward M. Kennedy that President Barack Obama delivered to Pope Benedict XVI earlier this year and an account of the pope’s response, as read by Cardinal Theodore E. McCarrick, archbishop emeritus of Washington:

“Most Holy Father I asked President Obama to personally hand deliver this letter to you. As a man of deep faith himself, he understands how important my Roman Catholic faith is to me, and I am so deeply grateful to him. I hope this letter finds you in good health. I pray that you have all of God’s blessings as you lead our church and inspire our world during these challenging times. I am writing with deep humility to ask that you pray for me as my own health declines.

“I was diagnosed with brain cancer more than a year ago and although I continue treatment, the disease is taking its toll on me. I am 77 years old and preparing for the next passage of life. I have been blessed to be part of a wonderful family and both of my parents, particularly my mother, kept our Catholic faith at the center of our lives. That gift of faith has sustained and nurtured and provides solace to me in the darkest hours. I know that I have been an imperfect human being, but with the help of my faith I have tried to right my path. I want you to know Your Holiness that in my nearly 50 years of elective office I have done my best to champion the rights of the poor and open doors of economic opportunity. I have worked to welcome the immigrant, to fight discrimination and expand access to health care and education. I have opposed the death penalty and fought to end war.

“Those are the issues that have motivated me and have been the focus of my work as a United States senator. I also want you to know that even though I am ill, I am committed to do everything I can to achieve access to health care for everyone in my country. This has been the political cause of my life. I believe in a conscience protection for Catholics in the health field and I will continue to advocate for it as my colleagues in the Senate and I work to develop an overall national health policy that guarantees health care for everyone. I have always tried to be a faithful Catholic, Your Holiness, and though I have fallen short through human failings, I have never failed to believe and respect the fundamental teachings of my faith. I continue to pray for God’s blessings on you and on our church and would be most thankful for your prayers for me.”

An account from the Vatican of the pope’s response, according to McCarrick . . . (continue reading)

Senator Ted Kennedy Will Not Become a Mormon Any Time Soon

August 28, 2009 by  
Filed under Patrick's Blog


The late Senator Kennedy’s funeral has not even taken place yet, and already someone who is either a member of the Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints (a.k.a. Mormons), or someone who would simply like to embarrass them, has been making preparations to share the “restored gospel” with the senator in the afterlife. Read on, and you’ll see what I mean.

One of the interesting and exotic features of the Mormon Church is its temple ritual of baptism for the dead. No, they don’t baptize dead bodies. Rather, church members who possess “temple recommends” (a document which officially certifies them for up to one year as being worthy) are encouraged to visit any of the 130+ Mormon temples around the world and are themselves baptized on behalf of deceased persons, who may not have ever been Mormon in this life. (For additional info, see this Catholic Answers tract adapted from an article I wrote in 1989 about Mormonism’s baptism for the dead).


Mormons sincerely believe that they can be baptized for deceased people who, the LDS Church teaches, are waiting in “spirit prison” for celestial Mormon missionaries to visit them, preach the gospel to them, and thus enable them — if the prisoner accepts the gospel message — to leave spirit prison and move upward along the path of eternal progression into the various levels of the celestial realm.

To wit, this comes from today’s Salt Lake Tribune:

It’s not certain whether the late Sen. Ted Kennedy would be more palatable to conservative Utah Republicans if he were a Mormon, but it appears someone tried to make that happen.

Just one day after Kennedy died, someone apparently posted his name on an LDS Church database to have him placed on the list to be posthumously baptized.

That posting was uncovered by researcher Helen Radkey, who has been critical of the church practice.

But, alas, Kennedy won’t become a Mormon anytime soon. Whoever placed his name on the list was not authorized to do so, and the church’s database security system put a block on it.

According to church policy, a person is not eligible to be baptized posthumously until a year after death. It also is against the policy for anyone to place someone’s name on the list who is not related to that person.

The security system also is set up to catch the listing of famous people, like Ted Kennedy, who may be placed on the list as a hoax. (Source)


Senator Ted Kennedy Will Not Become a Mormon Any Time Soon

August 28, 2009 by  
Filed under Patrick's Blog


The late Senator Kennedy’s funeral has not even taken place yet, and already someone who is either a member of the Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints (a.k.a. Mormons), or someone who would simply like to embarrass them, has been making preparations to share the “restored gospel” with the senator in the afterlife. Read on, and you’ll see what I mean.

One of the interesting and exotic features of the Mormon Church is its temple ritual of baptism for the dead. No, they don’t baptize dead bodies. Rather, church members who possess “temple recommends” (a document which officially certifies them for up to one year as being worthy) are encouraged to visit any of the 130+ Mormon temples around the world and are themselves baptized on behalf of deceased persons, who may not have ever been Mormon in this life. (For additional info, see this Catholic Answers tract adapted from an article I wrote in 1989 about Mormonism’s baptism for the dead).


Mormons sincerely believe that they can be baptized for deceased people who, the LDS Church teaches, are waiting in “spirit prison” for celestial Mormon missionaries to visit them, preach the gospel to them, and thus enable them — if the prisoner accepts the gospel message — to leave spirit prison and move upward along the path of eternal progression into the various levels of the celestial realm.

To wit, this comes from today’s Salt Lake Tribune:

It’s not certain whether the late Sen. Ted Kennedy would be more palatable to conservative Utah Republicans if he were a Mormon, but it appears someone tried to make that happen.

Just one day after Kennedy died, someone apparently posted his name on an LDS Church database to have him placed on the list to be posthumously baptized.

That posting was uncovered by researcher Helen Radkey, who has been critical of the church practice.

But, alas, Kennedy won’t become a Mormon anytime soon. Whoever placed his name on the list was not authorized to do so, and the church’s database security system put a block on it.

According to church policy, a person is not eligible to be baptized posthumously until a year after death. It also is against the policy for anyone to place someone’s name on the list who is not related to that person.

The security system also is set up to catch the listing of famous people, like Ted Kennedy, who may be placed on the list as a hoax. (Source)


Some Follow-Up Comments on Yesterday’s America Magazine Paroxysm

August 28, 2009 by  
Filed under Patrick's Blog

Some Follow-Up Comments on Yesterday's America Magazine Paroxysm

August 28, 2009 by  
Filed under Patrick's Blog

Cool Guys Don’t Look at Explosions

August 28, 2009 by  
Filed under Patrick's Blog

And now for something completely different. Yesterday was a bit more hectic than usual. So here’s some levity to change the pace.


Cool Guys Don't Look at Explosions

August 28, 2009 by  
Filed under Patrick's Blog

And now for something completely different. Yesterday was a bit more hectic than usual. So here’s some levity to change the pace.


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