Not a single Christian church left in Afghanistan, says State Department

October 11, 2011 by  
Filed under Patrick's Blog

But, but, what about all that talk we’ve been hearing about how Islam is “a religion of peace and tolerance”? Uh, well, according to one report that showed up this morning on the Drudge Report,

“There is not a single, public Christian church left in Afghanistan,” according to the U.S. State Department.

This reflects the state of religious freedom in that country ten years after the United States first invaded it and overthrew its Islamist Taliban regime.

In the intervening decade, U.S. taxpayers have spent $440 billion to support Afghanistan’s new government and more than 1,700 U.S. military personnel have died serving in that country.

The last public Christian church in Afghanistan was razed in March 2010, according to the Statet Department’s latest International Religious Freedom Report. The report, which was released last month and covers the period of July 1, 2010 through December 31, 2010, also states that “there were no Christian schools in the country.”

“There is no longer a public Christian church; the courts have not upheld the church’s claim to its 99-year lease, and the landowner destroyed the building in March [2010],” reads the State Department report on religious freedom. “[Private] chapels and churches for the international community of various faiths are located on several military bases, PRTs [Provincial Reconstruction Teams], and at the Italian embassy. Some citizens who converted to Christianity as refugees have returned.”

In recent times, freedom of religion has declined in Afghanistan, according to the State Department.

“The government’s level of respect for religious freedom in law and in practice declined during the reporting period, particularly for Christian groups and individuals,” reads the State Department report.

“Negative societal opinions and suspicion of Christian activities led to targeting of Christian groups and individuals, including Muslim converts to Christianity,” said the report. “The lack of government responsiveness and protection for these groups and individuals contributed to the deterioration of religious freedom.”

Most Christians in the country refuse to “state their beliefs or gather openly to worship,” said the State Department.

More than 1,700 U.S. military personnel have died serving in the decade-old Afghanistan war, according to CNSNews.com’s database of all U.S. casualties in Afghanistan. A September audit released jointly by the Special Inspector General for Afghanistan Reconstruction and the State Department’s Office of Inspector General, found that the U.S. government will spend at least $1.7 billion to support the civilian effort from 2009-2011.

According to that report, the $1.7 billion excludes additional security costs, which the report says the State Department priced at about $491 million.

A March 2011 report by the Congressional Research Service showed that overall the United States has spent more than $440 billion in the Afghanistan war. Christian aid from the international community has also gone to aid the Afghan government.

Nevertheless, according to the State Department, the lack of non-Muslim religious centers in Afghanistan can be blamed in part on a “strapped government budget,” which is primarily fueled by the U.S. aid.

“There were no explicit restrictions for religious minority groups to establish places of worship and training of clergy to serve their communities,” says the report, “however, very few public places of worship exist for minorities due to a strapped government budget.” . . . (continue reading)

Map of the world by population

April 11, 2011 by  
Filed under Patrick's Blog

I find this map very interesting and quite telling. Notice, for example, how disproportionately small Russia is compared to China and India and, for that matter, the United States. Compare Australia with Sri Lanka (both with 20 million inhabitants), Nigeria with France and Germany (Nigeria is equal to both of them combined), and Pakistan with Spain, France, and Germany (Muslim Pakistan is equal to all three of those “Christian” countries combined). As first-world players go, Canada is utterly negligible, as are Sweden, Norway, and Finland. Lowly Bangladesh dwarfs all of South America, with the exception of Brazil. Compare Muslim Indonesia with “Christian” Europe. What conclusions do you draw?

(Click the text link at the top of the post to enlarge map)

 

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